Wednesday Night Live: Flint Water Crisis Panel

October 12, 2016 - 7:00pm - 8:30pm
Location: 
RCAH Theater
362 Bogue Street, Terrace Level
East Lansing, MI 48825
United States

At 7 p.m. on Wednesday, October 12, join RCAH in welcoming a panel to discuss the Flint Water Crisis at the second Wednesday Night Live of the 2016-17 academic year.

All are welcome to attend, and doors will open at approximately 6:45 p.m.

About the panelists and moderator:

- Panelist STEVE CARMODY has been a reporter for Michigan Radio since 2005. Steve previously worked at public radio and television stations in Florida, Oklahoma and Kentucky, and also has extensive experience in commercial broadcasting. During his two and a half decades in broadcasting, Steve has won numerous awards, including accolades from the Associated Press and Radio and Television News Directors Association. Away from the broadcast booth, Steve is an avid reader and movie fanatic.

- Panelist EMILY ELCONIN is a senior with majors in Journalism (with a visual concentration) and the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities. Her area of study that she likes to focus on is social justice. Emily spent a little over three months traveling to Flint at least twice a week to see first-hand what the city was going through. As a staff photojournalist for The State News, one of her first assignments was to cover the protests for the Flint Water Crisis on the steps of the Capitol building in Lansing. From then on, her passion grew for helping to share stories of the world that need to be heard, including Stories From Flint. What Emily discovered in Flint was more than just a broken city suffering from one mistake -- she discovered what social injustice really means.

- Moderator SARA FINGAL is an Assistant Professor at MSU with a dual appointment in Lyman Briggs College and the Department of History. Her work to date ties together urban and rural history with an analysis of landscapes and ecosystems that transcend municipal, state, and national boundaries throughout North America. Her principal teaching and research areas are water history, environmental history, North American borderlands, social movements, the Great Lakes, and race and gender in post-1945 U.S. society and culture. Her current book manuscript is focused on conflicts over water access and property rights along the Pacific coastline in the mid-twentieth century. Additionally, she is researching abundant natural resource management and the role of women, children, and scientists in twentieth century environmental controversies.

- Panelist MELISSA MAYS has proudly lived in Flint since 2002. She supports local musicians, bands and charities. Before the poisoning of her city, Melissa’s life was all about music and my family. That changed in January 2015 when she received the TTHM violation notice telling her family that their water had a cancer-causing byproduct in it for 9 months and the State had never told them. She realized that every time they had been told that the water was safe, they were wrong.

She decided to start doing research and contacting environment experts and activists like Erin Brockovich, Robert Bowcock, Scott Smith, Mark Ruffalo, Lois Gibbs and more. Melissa and her husband formed Water You Fighting For and held a huge march February 14, 2015, which helped us launch an educational campaign to hold meetings, rallies, protests, and marches to keep the attention on what was happening to Flint residents. They connected with activists in Detroit and across Michigan to unite and stand together against the loss of democracy and denial to clean, safe, affordable water in this state.

- Panelist SAN JUANA OLIVARES is the president of the Genesee County Hispanic/Latino Collaborative in Flint. She is the oldest of six children and is dedicated to making Flint, Michigan, a better place for everyone that lives and works in and around the county.

San Juana was born on January 8, 1984, in Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico. She moved to Flint, Michigan, on June 10, 1994, and has resided there ever since. She attended Flint Central High School, but graduated from Mount Morris Alternative High School in 2003, becoming the first one in her family to receive a high school diploma and graduated a Salutatorian. San Juana was involved with the American GI Forum Flint Chapter and volunteered at Washington Elementary School, American GI Forum, the Genesee County Hispanic Latino Collaborative, and Durant Tuuri Mott, where she taught dance to Kindergarten through sixth graders.

San Juana was a member of ROTC 1999-2001 at Flint Central High School. She was President of S.A.D.D., played JV soccer and was team captain; she participated in the Upward Bound Program through Mott Community College.